APICe Products » TuCSoN » Theses » Available

Theses in the APICe space

Available

[TuCSoN]


Adattamento architetturale basato su coordinazione per sistemi socio-tecnici: un caso di studio in TuCSoN

Available since 16/05/2016
Contact Stefano Mariani [Mail]
Supervised by Andrea Omicini
Description
In "Christoph Dorn, Richard N Taylor. Architecture-driven modeling of adaptive collaboration structures in large-scale social web applications. Web Information Systems Engineering-WISE 2012, 2012" collaboration patterns between humans, within a socio-technical system devoted to online collaboration, are identified and then exploited to drive adaptation of the architecture and services provided by the computational part of the system. Many of the requirements there describe seem to be met by coordination models, e.g., by TuCSoN: (i) encapsulating elements into suitable coordination abstractions (e.g., ACCs, transducers, tuple centres), (ii) controlling interactions by means of suitably programmed coordination media (e.g., ReSpecT tuple centres), (iii) managing interaction state through reification of interaction-related events (e.g., using TuCSoN logic tuples). In particular, the notion of coordination artefact seems to encompass many key features in enabling architectural adaptation based on collaboration patterns.

The thesis will study the open issue of architectural adaptation of computational platforms driven by collaboration patterns, looking for potential solutions in the coordination models and languages field. Then, the thesis will conceive, design, and implement a prototype of the solution upon the TuCSoN infrastructure, and exploiting the ReSpecT language.


Modernizing Linda eval Primitive: spawn with Code-on-Demand

Available since 16/05/2016
Contact Stefano Mariani [Mail]
Supervised by Andrea Omicini
Description
The Linda model features a rather ignored primitive called "eval", meant to delegate simple context-aware expression evaluation to the tuple space in charge of mediating interactions. Its unclear semantics and expressiveness reach pushed researchers toward novel definitions and/or interpretations of such a primitive. TuCSoN, for instance, provides its own interpretation of the eval primitive, suitably defined and extended, called "spawn". TuCSoN spawn primitive is meant to delegate coordination-related computations to the coordination medium, provided certain restrictions on expressiveness, for the sake of consistency and safety, are satisfied---e.g., a spawn can only perform coordination operations locally.

The thesis aims at surveying other existing implementation of the eval primitive, comparing them with the spawn, then advancing the spawn implementation so as to feature code-on-demand capabilities, necessary for mobile scenarios.


Multi-platform Coordination Middleware: TuCSoN between Java and .NET

Available since 16/05/2016
Contact Stefano Mariani [Mail]
Supervised by Andrea Omicini
Description
Modern distributed systems are increasingly heterogeneous both in hardware and in software, with different operating systems, execution environments, etc. Availability of multi-platform coordination middleware is thus more relevant as ever.

For these reasons, the thesis aims at designing and implementing a TuCSoN port over .NET framework, with particular care on interoperability with usual Java-based TuCSoN distribution, modularity and encapsulation of platform-specific code, and reproducibility of the platform-specific deployment process.


Coordination as a Service: Distributing TuCSoN as a Cloud-based Service

Available since 16/05/2016
Contact Stefano Mariani [Mail]
Supervised by Andrea Omicini
Description
The Cloud has become the most widespread incarnation of the "as a service" paradigm, from infrastructure, to middleware services, up to application bundles. In the specific field of coordination, too, the Cloud may play an important role in enabling and promoting the "Coordination as a Service" paradigm, where, essentially, coordination services are requested by applications to Cloud-hosted "coordination providers", e.g., through a RESTful interface. In order to do so, not only technical issues have to be addressed -- e.g., in the case of tuple-based coordination, how to (re)distribute the coordination load among a dynamic set of tuple spaces -- but also, perhaps more importantly, conceptual ones, such as: what does it mean to deliver coordination as a service? what is the service (the tuple space storage? the coordination operations? the coordination laws? both?)? which is the business model? and the like.

The thesis aims to advance the state of the "Coordination as a service" paradigm by conceiving and developing a model and prototype for distributing TuCSoN coordination services in the Cloud.